Doctor Q&A: Dr Costas Karageorghis

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Dr Costas Karageorghis is a Reader in Sport Psychology at Brunel University London. His latest book is published by Human Kinetics (2017) and titled Applying Music in Exercise and Sport. You can interact with Dr Karageorghis and his research group on Twitter: @SAVIBrunel

How important is synchronising your movement with music to get the most out of your work out?

It’s certainly the case that synching your movement with music, and particularly in a group scenario, unlocks a whole series of brain connections that are primeval and so the experience can be immensely rewarding. I would not say that synching is essential for a good workout but for those who struggle to adhere to exercise, it can have a profoundly positive influence.

Do you think exercise should be fun?

I am a proponent of the hedonistic approach to exercise and, for the general population at least, fun is an essential element of any exercise regimen. If it’s not fun, your affective memory – how you think you felt – will eventually lead you to discontinue the exercise. Having fun and enjoying meaningful relationships with other people are important determinants of exercise adherence

Do think sharing exercise experiences creates more commitment?

Where we share experiences with people who share are values/aspirations and they are also comparable to us in terms of their fitness level, this can certainly create greater commitment. You are far more likely to commit to an exercise session when you have an obligation to someone else than when you just try to fit it in whenever you can around your busy lifestyle. Commitment is inherent to the notion of a shared experience.

Do you think euphoric exercise can be curated by engaging the senses, for example adding music reactive visuals with music? In recent years, my research group at Brunel has been examining the effects of immersive exercise environments. This research started with large screens and blaring music, and has now progressed to the realm of virtual reality with the advent of new technologies. Exercise that engages the senses in a meaningful way and thus engenders a fullsynaesthetic experience can lead to a tremendous sense of pleasure and well-being.

Do you think immersion is a key driver in the future of fitness?

From the enquiries that we receive, it appears that the fitness industry is increasingly interested in immersive modes of physical activity. The tide of sedentariness and the problems we have with obesity in the western world might be addressed, in part, by finding novel modes of physical activity that are predicated on immersive experiences. I predict that synaesthetic engagement will revolutionise fitness over the next two decades in a manner akin to what Hollywood actress Jane Fonda did with exercise-to-music during the late 70s and through the 80s.

What do think happens when you add music reactive light to music during exercise? Reactive light heightens the experience of music because it engages a greater proportion of the brain in such a manner that the auditory and visual pathway stimulation is complementary in nature (like being in a confectionary shop and sampling the chocolate!). The combination of auditory and visual cues make it all the more easier to synch your movements to the beat and thus get ‘lost in music’. This means that the reactive light to music can help you enter a zen-like state that psychologists refer to as ‘flow’.

What about scent and music does this creative different endorphins? Scent is also a powerful stimulus but research into scent and exercise is only at a nascent stage (get the pun there?!). The initial research that I’ve read suggests that the smell of lavender is effective in diverting attention from the sensations of fatigue. It’s not the case that the scent creates “different endorphins”; some scents, however, might intensify the release of endorphins. This would need to be the subject of future scientific inquiry.

Can a playlist you have listened to previously enhance and prime your motivation to exercise? We create all sorts of associations with musical stimuli in our minds. Accordingly, if we’ve had a particularly good experience with a playlist – this can be socially or during exercise – when we hear it again, the memory centres of the brain are activated and it can engender a positive feeling. Of course, the converse also holds, and where we have negative associations with a particular playlist, it can create a string of negative emotions. Responsiveness to music is very individual indeed and it is the case that one person’s music can be another person’s noise. Nonetheless, music provides a ‘superhighway’ to our memories.

Do you think exercise can be playful & fun rather than serious & competitive? Exercise can be a ludic activity and, depending on how it’s organised and how the intensity is varied, can be great fun to participate in. Some people take exercise very seriously and push themselves to their physical limits. For the vast majority of the exercising public, a more playful/fun exercise experience is likely to result in higher levels of adherence. Ultimately, placing more emphasis on fun might have an enormous influence on the health of the nation.

We all know that exercise decreases anxiety but when in a worried mood how can we motivate ourselves to exercise? I would need to question the premise of your question! The exercise environment is well known for magnifying a phenomenon known as ‘social physique anxiety’. This is where people fear negative evaluation from others when showing their bodies or being active in a public forum such as a gym, exercise studio or swimming pool. If we focus just on getting out of a state of worry or depression, our research shows that happy music in a tempo range 90-120 bpm can function as an excellent primer. Music has a unique power in terms of modulating mood and to use this power at an advanced level, you can find a piece of music that reflects your current mood and then with additional pieces, take you towards your desired mood. There has been a great deal of research into mood regulation with music and in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Wolverhampton, we have developed and published the Music Mood-Regulation Scale to help people in their selection of music for this purpose (see http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/4625).

ARTIST Q&A: Slugabed

slugabed is a music composer, protooter, CDJ & bongwriter. YUNG CLUB is super excited to have Slugabed’s WILD CHILD playlists for our yoga experiences. He's also one of the founders of the very cool Activia Benz record label, which has been talked about and mentioned by loads of people in loads of conversations. He's recently been flying around the world performing music in such places as los angeles, bangalore & lyme regis. he's lying about one of those places, guess which one. he's a hugely successful and really wildly talented guy, and he writes fantastic bios.

What first attracted you to being a DJ?
I think everyone likes playing their fav songs to people, right? when u r in the uber everyone's always clamouring for the aux cable to play u a cool new jam. being a DJ is like you always get the aux cable, and u get to make everyone in the proverbial uber happy. sharing something u love is always gunna be fun, and doing it in a club while jumping around is even better.

What do you look for in a perfect club song?
I like stuff that makes you feel some type of something about something. not just "hell yea lets get some more shots" but more like "i’m literally crying". although there is pros & cons to both. you wouldn’t want to be literally crying the entire night. it’s all about peaks and troughs. I also like music that makes half the dancefloor want to leave, but the other half lose their minds. It’s important to shake things up and not make it too comfortable for everyone, because experiences are always being watered down to have more mass appeal, across all aspects of our lives, and clubbing is an environment where there ought to be an attitude of anything goes, in my opinion. If we lose that then we have lost to the man, man.

Why do think music helps motivate movement?
People all have a sort of a rhythm bangin away inside them I think, and it just needs a little encouragement to get out into the physical world. Even the biggest clutz in the world can relate to a beat, cos its like ur heart and It’s like the waves and it’s like everything. It’s an ancient thing, and drums and africa and blah blah blah you get the idea.

How would you describe your style?
i wouldn't, usually. I can be awkward like that I suppose.

What's been the biggest influence on your style overall or recently and why?

I’ve spent quite a lot of time listening to my own music, and jazz and proggy stuff. I also listen to clubby stuff and rappy stuff. I like guitars and flutes and 808s and trumpets and the sound of birds. I think the simpsons theme is impeccable. I love oneohtrix point never. i used to record sounds when I traveled and try to find music in the sounds and then remake the music that I found in the sounds, but then my recorder broke. I’m not sure what my biggest influence has been.

What new track have you got on repeat right now and why?
[taylor mcferrin - postpartum (dorian concept remix)
][1]This track kinda has it all for me right now. It’s kinda emotional, but feel good. its got those nice jazzy chords. but also you can jump around to it if u like. I like the way it builds. Real clench-your-fists type stuff.

[1]: http://slugabed is a music composer, protooter, CDJ & bongwriter. YUNG CLUB is super excited to have Slugabed’s WILD CHILD playlists for our yoga experiences. He's also one of the founders of the very cool Activia Benz record label, which has been talked about and mentioned by loads of people in loads of conversations. He's recently been flying around the world performing music in such places as los angeles, bangalore & lyme regis. he's lying about one of those places, guess which one. he's a hugely successful and really wildly talented guy, and he writes fantastic bios. What first attracted you to being a DJ? I think everyone likes playing their fav songs to people, right? when u r in the uber everyone's always clamouring for the aux cable to play u a cool new jam. being a DJ is like you always get the aux cable, and u get to make everyone in the proverbial uber happy. sharing something u love is always gunna be fun, and doing it in a club while jumping around is even better. What do you look for in a perfect club song? I like stuff that makes you feel some type of something about something. not just "hell yea lets get some more shots" but more like "i’m literally crying". although there is pros & cons to both. you wouldn’t want to be literally crying the entire night. it’s all about peaks and troughs. I also like music that makes half the dancefloor want to leave, but the other half lose their minds. It’s important to shake things up and not make it too comfortable for everyone, because experiences are always being watered down to have more mass appeal, across all aspects of our lives, and clubbing is an environment where there ought to be an attitude of anything goes, in my opinion. If we lose that then we have lost to the man, man. Why do think music helps motivate movement? People all have a sort of a rhythm bangin away inside them I think, and it just needs a little encouragement to get out into the physical world. Even the biggest clutz in the world can relate to a beat, cos its like ur heart and It’s like the waves and it’s like everything. It’s an ancient thing, and drums and africa and blah blah blah you get the idea. How would you describe your style? i wouldn't, usually. I can be awkward like that I suppose. What's been the biggest influence on your style overall or recently and why? I’ve spent quite a lot of time listening to my own music, and jazz and proggy stuff. I also listen to clubby stuff and rappy stuff. I like guitars and flutes and 808s and trumpets and the sound of birds. I think the simpsons theme is impeccable. I love oneohtrix point never. i used to record sounds when I traveled and try to find music in the sounds and then remake the music that I found in the sounds, but then my recorder broke. I’m not sure what my biggest influence has been. What new track have you got on repeat right now and why? taylor mcferrin - postpartum (dorian concept remix) This track kinda has it all for me right now. It’s kinda emotional, but feel good. its got those nice jazzy chords. but also you can jump around to it if u like. I like the way it builds. Real clench-your-fists type stuff.

ARTIST Q&A: Mark Adams, Unit7

Unit7 is, a reinterpretation of dance music where futurism and nostalgia are no longer distinct. Their WRHSmusic imprint represents the thing they love most — music made for warehouses big and small that unite people with a groove and a shared imperative to dance together. Having played around the world under a previous alias, reactions have always played a front seat role in their musical output, which is what has lead to this reinterpretation. Unit7 is a pledge of allegiance to this simple mantra: Long live the beat, the good times and the dancefloor. Yung Club is totally psyched to have Mark create our SPACED OUT playlist for YUNG CLUB yoga at Selfridges My 25 - June 10, 2016.

What first attracted you to being a DJ?
Girls.

What do you look for in a perfect club song?
Something that has incredible flow and puts you in a completely hypnotic state. I’m not looking for anything that’s fun. In fact, the less fun — the better, to be honest. I don’t see electronic music as a musical thing, it’s more of a sonic only experience.

Why do you think music helps motivate movement?
Music absolutely controls people in a way that nothing else can. The dark side of me loves looking out, when I’m DJ-ing and seeing that I’ve got people in the palm of my hand, and then I like to abuse that privilege by turning their heads inside out. Music is the only thing that truly takes you out of your thinking mind and into a different type of flow that is about being or thinking.

How would you describe your style?
I would describe my style as insidious and with a high degree of malice. The way I see the opportunity of a group of people in front of me is to fuck them up. I take to the decks with the same mentality that someone would enter a cage to fight another person. In my view, it’s a battle of willpower and it’s my plan to totally dominate and take over the minds of everyone that’s in front of me and then use that power to heal them in some way after they’ve been through a lot of darkness.

What’s been the biggest influence on your style overall or recently and why?
I would never forget hearing Radiohead’s Kid A for the first time on the Radio 1 Breezeblock show with Mary Anne Hobbs and Thom York has described that Radiohead had been listening to a lot of Warp records. Once, this was my bridge from strumming a guitar to realising that electronic music could be extremely serious and took a very different mentality to get your head around, but was actually more transcendent than anything that I’ve ever experienced. That was, pretty much, the biggest “wow” moment of my life. The next one came a year later, when I saw The Prodigy and almost bit my tongue in half in the mosh pit and realised that electronic music could be tougher and more militant than the rock I was listening to at the time. Then, as time went on, I dug back into it and realised that it was actually something deeply political about getting people of different races and sexual orientations together in an environment where everyone’s safe and it’s not about fights or pulling birds. I’ve become 50% obsessed with music and 50% obsessed with the culture of electronic and to be honest with you, that has ceaselessly continued up to this day.

What new track have you got on repeat now and why?
The new track that I have on repeat right now is The Djrum Remix of Ballade by Jono McCleery. It’s everything that’s right about bass-heavy techno music and it has a little avantgarde-indie element to it as well, which I absolutely love. I’ve said this a million times and most of my friends are sick of me saying it, but I honestly believe that every single year the music just gets better and better. In my day job, I spend my whole life talking about innovation and I truly believe that my love of innovation comes from my love of music that keeps moving forward all the time. I frankly think that it’s fucking tragic to look at the cover of Mojo Magazine or NME and see these people who consistently dig deeper and deeper into the troth of nostalgia, and at the same time, any music that I’ve ever loved, I would never turn my back on in later life. People who claim that some types of music are uncool are fucking knob-cheeses who don’t know enough about the etymology of music, to see the bigger picture and to realise that it’s all linked. I love techno and I could take anyone on in a conversation about it. I love brain-frazzling electronica and I could take anyone on in a conversation about it. But I also equally love garage, drum and bass, and I know everything there is to know about disco and late 90’s trance and enjoy taking people apart when they make a little face as I proudly admit that.

ARTIST Q&A: Dave Juric

YUNG CLUB is proud to welcome resident playlist DJ Dave Juric to our Selfridges exhibition from May 25 to June 10. So far this year Dave has already supported Carl Cox on NYD and played alongside Henry Saiz, Sébastien Léger, Thomas Schumacher as well as UK legend Jody Wisternoff. One of the highlights for Dave last year was playing a warm-up set for his musical hero Henry Saiz which was then selected by Red Bull as one of the 10 Best Sets of 2015.

For YUNG CLUB X Selfridges, Melbourne’s Dave Juric will be our resident DEEP SEA playlist DJ.

Book your experience today.

What first attracted you to DJing?
Ultimately it was just a pure unadulterated love of music. I always had this desire to share the music I loved with others. For my whole life it’s been about seeking out tracks that maybe weren’t on the radio or popular. It was all about the random tracks on albums, or songs that I’d hear from my brothers or my friends. I had this massive CD collection as a kid. Mainly hip hop to start but as I got older I discovered Dimitri from Paris – Night at the Playboy Mansion and Daft Punk and my exploration into house / disco and electronic music blossomed from there. I think at the end of the day I still have that same desire; to seek out hidden gems and share them with people.

What do you look for in a perfect club song?
Tough question! I guess for me, what I’m looking for is some sort of syncopated rhythm. I’m always drawn to tracks that have swing to it, something to make the shoulders move. Again it’s drawn to that hip hop background of mine, funk / soul & breaks is a big part of my DNA so even if I’m playing house or techno I love finding tracks that have that same sort of broken or swinging beat.

Why do you think music helps motivate movement?
I have no doubt it’s purely a primal reaction. Rhythms and repetition go back forever. Dancing is one of those brilliant cathartic experiences as well, releases endorphins and all that jazz. It can also be an incredibly social experience. The right music at the right moment in the right environment is magic.

How would you describe your style?
I was talking to a group of people the other day who asked me that same question. Now these people weren’t necessarily versed in the specific language of my scene so if I said I play a blend of melodic house & techno they wouldn’t have a point of reference to relate to.

The word that I used to describe my style is warm. Regardless of genre, I always try to bring an element of warmth to my sound, be that through melodies, basslines or a vocal hook.

What new tracks have you got on repeat and why?
I buy new tracks every week so I have hundreds to choose from so I’m just going to go back to my last week or so and find tracks that have that warmth that I was just talking about.

Each of these have this really warm spacey vibe that kind of traps you in this sort of loopy vortex. Also the vocal on ‘Soak It’ are sexy as hell. I’m a sucker for a female vocal.

Red Axes – Way to Neptune
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wF1CDbRqU9c

Hyenah - Soak It Feat. Nonku (Andre Lodemann Remix)

Daraspa - Patterns (Deepfunk Remix)

ARTIST Q&A: KRYSTAL ROXX

YUNG CLUB is proud to welcome resident playlist DJ, producer and artist Krystal Roxx to our Selfridges exhibition from May 25 to June 10. Krystal is has taken her DJ sets to huge, live shows, club nights and events around the world, playing with Fat Boy Slim, Bakermat, Felix Jaehan, Taio Cruz, Ricky Martin and UK-based record label Hed Kandi. Her new song 'Get Ur Roxx Off' hit the top 10 in the UK Club Charts in 2016. She’s also the founder and label boss of SUPERFOXX, a brilliant brand that brings together immersive clubbing, a passion for music, mentorship, fitness and empowerment.

For YUNG CLUB X Selfridges, London’s Krystal Roxx will be a resident playlist DJ for our DREAM CITY experiences.

Book your experience today

What first attracted you to being a DJ?
When I first started making mixtapes for friends and started to share music with people I found I was drawn to performing the music and it is one of the greatest things on earth. Connecting over new artists and old favourites, lifting people's spirits and most importantly of all dancing non stop!

What do you look for in a perfect club song?
The perfect club track needs swag and a solid bounce with builds and drops to drive the crowd wild! It's all about creating a vibe and energy.

Why do think music helps motivate movement?
Music is emotive, it makes you feel and that feeling becomes fuel. When you match sound and rhythm and vibe to movement you add a whole other dimension.

How would you describe your style?
Energetic, brave, entertaining! I like creating an atmosphere where people can feel free to let go and party.

What's been the biggest influence on your style overall or recently and why?
I tend to stay true to music I love rather then follow trends. Fat Boy Slim is a huge influence, I saw him a few years ago at Ushuaia and since opening for him at Morning Glory and watching him work up close I totally respect the power of his music and energy.

What new track have you got on repeat right now and why?
Shamelessly I'll have to say my next single 'Say Yes' because it's such a powerhouse of positivity and features Kelli-Leigh who is not only in my opinion THE voice of UK house music and a total Superfoxx!

What first attracted you to being a DJ?
When I first made mixtapes for friends and started to share music with people I found I was drawn to performing the music and it is one of the greatest things on earth. Connecting over new artists and old favourites, lifting people's spirits and most importantly, dancing non-stop!

What do you look for in a perfect club song?
The perfect club track needs swag and a solid bounce with builds and drops to drive the crowd wild! It's all about creating a vibe and energy.

Why do think music helps motivate movement?
Music is emotive, it makes you feel and that feeling becomes fuel. When you match sound and rhythm and vibe to movement you add a whole other dimension.

How would you describe your style?

Energetic, brave, entertaining! I like creating an atmosphere where people can feel free to let go and party.

What's been the biggest influence on your style overall or recently and why?

I tend to stay true to music I love rather than follow trends. Fat Boy Slim is a huge influence, I saw him a few years ago at Ushuaia and since opening for him at Morning Gloryville and watching him work up close I totally respect the power of his music and energy.

What new track have you got on repeat right now and why?

Shamelessly I'll have to say my next single 'Say Yes' because it's such a powerhouse of positivity and features Kelli-Leigh who is not only in my opinion THE voice of UK house music and a total Superfoxx!